30

aug

by ton

De laatste tijd zit ik weer veel naar Bretonse muziek te luisteren.
Hieronder eerst Tri Yann met La jument de Michao, daarna Gilles Servat, Dan Ar Braz, Tri Yann, Alan Stivell and L’héritage Des Celtes met An Alarc’h.

Uit Locus Online:

Since 2003, the Creative Commons movement has ridden a worldwide revolution in creativity and sharing, inspiring the authors of over 160 million copyrighted works to adopt a “some rights reserved” approach that encourages sharing, remix, and re-use of their works. CC licenses come in a variety of flavors, and in many jurisdictional variants, but at root, they are simple to use and apply, and they bring great benefit to “audiences” and “creators” (and help to blur the details between these two crude categories).

First, some background. Through most of its four-hundred-odd-year history, copyright has only applied to a special class of works, generally those created with the intention of commercial exploitation. Many governments — especially the US government — only granted copyright to authors who registered with a national library, depositing copies of each copyrighted work in the country’s authoritative repository of important creative works. These libraries also served as central registries, making it easy to figure out whose permission you needed when you wanted to use a copyrighted work.

But a perfect storm of social, legal, and technical changes resulted in an enormous shift in the way that copyright applies. First, the duration of copyright was extended (and extended, and extended — 11 times in the past 40 years), every time the earliest Mickey Mouse cartoons approached the day of their expiry. This has transformed copyright from a temporary monopoly (originally, the US had a 14-year copyright, renewable by the author for a further 14 years) into a permanent one. This means that while yesterday’s authors, readers, fans, printers, and other users of copyrights could draw on a relatively fresh pool of copyrighted works to use for free and without limitation, today’s copyright users might have to dig back more than a century to find works that they can copy, transform, and re-use (think of how Walt Disney was able to adapt works by Lewis Carroll and Washington Irving without permission or payment).

In addition to the problem of expanding length of copyright is the expanding scope of copyright. Since 1988, the US has come into compliance with an international copyright accord called the Berne Convention (originally created by Victor Hugo nearly 200 years before to push the US into paying him and other foreigners royalties for the US editions of their work). Berne prohibits “formalities,” such as registration with the Library of Congress, for the securing of copyright. This means that today, nearly every single work is copyrighted at the very instant that it is “fixed” (recorded, written, filmed). So while before only a small class of commercial work was roped-off from social re-use by scholars, creators, audiences and educators, today, every single creation is owned by someone from the very instant that it is imagined, and will stay property for a minimum of 70 years and for as long as a century and a half, depending on the lifespan of the author. Meanwhile, most old works languish unloved and unregarded — the Supreme Court found in Eldred v. Ashcroft that some 98 percent of all copyrighted works are not in print or available.

But this isn’t the only way that copyright’s scope has expanded. Technology — the PC and the Internet — has moved our social lives from the street to cyberspace. In “meatspace,” our conversations, interactions, and chin-jawing maunderings tend not to be “fixed” — they’re not recorded or written down. No one owns them. If I quote something you said to me over breakfast while I’m at lunch, there’s no copyright violation. But if I copy something you posted to your blog and put it into my blog, I potentially violate your exclusive rights to control copying, adaptation, display and performance of your “work.”

This is a dire circumstance. Copyright lasts, fundamentally, forever. It applies, fundamentally, to everything. And this is all happening at the moment when the net is giving more people the chance to communicate to more people in more ways than we ever imagined (and certainly in more ways than Congress imagined when it wrote and revised 17USC, the American copyright law).

It would be nice if our lawmakers would go back to the drawing board and write a new copyright that made sense in the era of the Internet, but all efforts to “fix” copyright since the passage of the US Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) in 1998 have only made things worse, granting more unenforceable exclusive rights to an ever-increasing pool of “authors” who have no need or desire to sue the people with whom they are engaged in the business of “culture” — holding conversations, publicly re-imagining the stories that make up their lives.

Creative Commons aims to do what Congress won’t or can’t do — offer an approach to copyright that helps those of us who don’t want deal that Disney and their pals have insisted on for every snatch of creativity. Creative Commons achieves this through a set of licenses, legal notices that set out permitted uses for creative works.

All Creative Commons share a set of basic terms. Every license requires “attribution” — subsequent users have to keep your name on your work, and let everyone know that you’re the originator of it; and every CC license permits noncommercial sharing of your work — people can make as many copies they want and give them to whomever they want, provided they don’t make any money from this activity.

In addition to these terms, you, as a creator, get to choose what freedoms you’ll grant with the license to your work. When you visit http://creativecommons.org/license/, you’re presented with a simple form that asks you to specify whether:

Users may make commercial uses of your work — can they charge money or get paid for the things they do with your works?
Users may “creative derivative works” — that is, can they modify, adapt, remix or otherwise tinker with your work? And, if so, whether:
Users are required to share their creations on the same terms — that is, if I make a movie from your book, am I required to share my movie on the same terms as your book?

After you check off a few boxes on the Creative Commons license form, you’ll get a page with the license for your work. This consists of a short block of computer code you paste into your book, image, web page, or what-have-you. This code displays a graphic badge showing the license you’ve chosen, with a link back to the license and a block of hidden “machine readable” text. This is text that search-engines can use to figure out which files are shared, and under which terms (you can limit searches on Flickr, Google, or Yahoo to only show Creative Commons licensed results).

Additionally, the machine-readable version links to two other versions of the licenses — a “human readable” plain-language version that can be understood by anyone, and a “lawyer-readable” version of small print that says the same thing in legally binding terms.

Creative Commons licenses are international — over 80 countries have their own CC projects — and something licensed under CC in the USA can be combined with Israeli, Indian, Brazilian, Spanish, British, South African and German CC works without violating the terms of any of their licenses.

This is a major accomplishment — volunteer legal scholars (Creative Commons is a charitable nonprofit) working at universities and firms all over the planet have pulled together the greatest legal hack every accomplished: a single, unified copyright system that crosses borders as easily as Internet packets.

The universality of CC means that literally hundreds of millions of people understand how they work — copyright is a fiendishly complex subject and it’s a rare educator, reader, or writer (or publisher!) with a really exhaustive understanding of its minutiae. But the norms and terms of CC licenses are in practice in fields of endeavor as diverse as fiction, film-making, map-making, software documentation, engineering papers, needlepoint, food photography, and tour-book writing. Courts are slowly testing CC’s terms (and finding them valid!), building up a global jurisprudence that you can take to the bank. All this is taking the lawyers out of the law, letting us engage in the Internet’s natural, social, conversational modes without turning ourselves into accidental felons, and without hiring $400/hour white-shoe copyright attorneys to sit at our elbows and make sure our copying and pasting is within the bounds of the law.

There are two more things you need to know about CC licenses. First, they are global and irrevocable. Once you release a work under a CC license, you can’t take it back, ever, and they apply equally to everyone. Remember, the purpose of a CC license is to encourage re-use: if I’m a translator in Spain who translates your story from English, I want to be sure that my version can stay online before I invest the effort — and so does the teacher in Venezuela who makes an educational course-pack based on the translation, the illustrator in Canada who creates a series of paintings to accompany it, and the voice-over actor in Dominica who produces an audio version for her blind friends.

Second, CC licenses don’t overrule “fair use.” Fair use is the US legal concept (other countries usually have “fair dealing,” a closely related concept) setting out the conditions under which information users don’t need a creator’s permission to use her works. For example, critics and others can quote works, make personal copies, and so on, and if they are sued, they can defend themselves on the basis that what they did was “fair.” Fair use is hard to navigate — you generally have to wait for a judge’s decision before you know whether a use is fair or not — but it is still vital to free expression, creativity, scholarship and political discourse. You may choose a non-commercial CC license, but that doesn’t mean that you can prevent a newspaper critic from quoting your novel in a harsh review because the newspaper is “commercial.”

I’ve been applying CC licenses to my books since my first novel, Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom, which launched the same week that CC did. I’ve written extensively about why I do this (see my previous Locus columns at ), but I haven’t written much about how the licenses work. Search engines like Yahoo can find over 160 million CC-licensed works in the wild, released by creators of every description. Until our lawmakers give us a copyright that works with the Internet instead of against it, this is our best hope for the future.

30

aug

by ton

Een bericht van Dordrecht.net:

Ton Delemarre: ,,Winkelcentrum Drievriendenhof in Dordrecht sof.” 29 augustus 2011

DORDRECHT -Het winkelcentrum de Drievriendenhof in Dordrecht lijkt, met lege winkels, steeds meer een zorgenkindje te worden. AD De Dordtenaar besteedde er vandaag aandaccht aan.

Ton Delemarre schreef er eerder ook een artikel over in het blad voor de binnenstad De Poorter. hij hoopt dat de kwestie aandacht krijgt op het komende Grote Stadsdebat op 7 september in het dordrechts Museum.

Zijn verhaal:

DrievriendenSOF

Sales continue inside, meldt een biljet aan de ingang van de Drievriendenhof.

En inderdaad de hele Drievriendenhof blijkt in de uitverkoop. De kop van de Teevorm, waar Mexx en Brandstore zaten is een somber gat aan het eind. Broodjescounter Délifrance ligt er als laatste overlevende van een schipbreuk verlaten bij. Een goedkope SCHOENEN VOOR WEINIG vult nu de vele vierkante meters die het vertrekkende modehuis Forecast achterliet. Schoenwinkel Footsie is bankroet, evenals Villa Hap (kinderkleding).

Bij Björn Borg een plakkaat: OPHEFFINGSUITVERKOOP tot 70%. Bij SPS hetzelfde bord: 27 augustus de laatste dag. De reden van deze leegstand is uiterst simpel: te weinig omzet voor de te hoge huur. Het personeel mag dat niet hardop zeggen, maar de drastisch teruglopende bezoekersaantallen (met 30% tussen 2007 en 2010) spreken luid en duidelijk.

Vijf jaar geleden moest zo nodig een nieuw concept ingevoerd worden. Goedlopende winkels als juwelier de Meij moesten tegen hun wil verkassen. Met Délifrance werd een rechtszaak uitgevochten. Het idee was dat alleen hoogwaardige kledingwinkels (met daaromheen wat accessoires) een sterke magneet zouden vormen voor het Dordtse publiek. Het was van het begin af aan duidelijk dat dit moest mislukken omdat Dordrecht qua koopkracht onder het gemiddelde scoort.

Eerlijkheidshalve moet gezegd worden dat het in de beginjaren van deze eeuw ook niet zo goed ging met dit winkelcentrum. De facelift die het in 2006 onderging kon niet wegnemen dat van het begin af aan er een fout zat in de ligging. Je moet teruggaan naar het rampzalige saneringsplan, dat een kaalslag voor dit hele gebied betekende, en de vierpolen filosofie van Wethouder Piet Janse, die ten grondslag ligt aan de bouw van dit project. In 1985 gaf de Dordtse Commissie Kunst en Architectuur vijf bekende Nederlandse architectenbureaus (Benthem Crouwel, OMA, Pi de Bruyn, Frits van Dongen en Theo Bosch) opdracht een ontwerp te maken als ‘stedebouwkundige en architectonische verkenning naar de bebouwingsmogelijkheden van de Drievriendenhof’. Daarin zouden winkels, een ‘vestzaktheater’, twee bioscoopzalen, een café-restaurant en een galerie ondergebracht kunnen worden. Benthem en Crouwel maakte een prachtig ontwerp dat zich niet aan de gestelde grenzen hield omdat het idee de hof een onderdeel van een winkelroute te maken niet deugde. Het winkelend publiek zal zich er niet naar toe laten lokken was hun voorspelling. Het bureau weigerde een verdere opdracht omdat de gemeente hun uitgangspunt niet overnam. Ook het ontwerp van Theo Bosch (die de Boogjes had ontworpen) werd niet uitgevoerd. De projectontwikkelaar zag het niet zitten en gaf de opdracht aan K. Rijnboutt. Rudger Smook zegt hierover in het standaardwerk over de geschiedenis van Dordrecht (Uitgeverij Verloren 2000 dl 3 pag. 409): ‘Met dit plan werden de uitersten verkend van wat een historische binnenstad kan verdragen. Omdat het plan structureel slecht in de binnenstad en in het winkelpatroon van het centrumgebied past is het nooit een succes geworden’.

Het is dus de vraag of het ooit een succes kan worden. Een drastische verlaging van de huurprijzen lijkt minimaal nodig. De eigenaar Syntrus Achmea Vastgoed B.V. heeft het winkelcentrum in beheer gegeven bij SCM Shopping Center Management (dat ook winkels op het Statenplein en Bieshof in Stadspolders onder zijn beheer heeft). De gemeente Dordrecht bemoeit zich niet met de huurprijzen zegt woordvoerder Mark Benjamin. Vanuit de economische afdeling is wel overleg met SCM omdat de gemeente het belang van een levendige en economisch vatbare binnenstad hoog in het vaandel heeft. Wat in het overleg besproken is blijft geheim. Achmea heeft plannen voorgelegd waar de gemeente wel positief tegenover staat. Ir. Niels de Bis die bij SCM de Drievriendenhof in zijn portefeuille heeft mag telefonisch geen statement afgeven. De eigenaar Syntrus Achmea wil dat niet. De heer Vierkant van Syntrus Achmea doet zijn naam eer aan en geeft geen informatie over de huurprijzen noch over de toekomstplannen. Hij doet geen mededeling of Dixons en Kruidvat in aanmerking komen, noch met welke mogelijke gegadigden gesprekken worden gevoerd.

Volgens hem valt het allemaal wel mee met teruglopende bezoekerstallen (dat is een landelijke trend) en is er alleen sprake van enige tegenslag door toevallige incidenten met faillissementen van landelijke ketens. Of de formule van hoogwaardige kledingwinkels wordt herzien? “Wij bekijken alle mogelijkheden”. Hij erkent dat er een probleem is met de aanloopstraten, maar de ontwikkeling van het Achterom, waardoor het winkelgebeuren verder uit het centrum trekt, juicht hij toe. Want hij gelooft nog in ‘het circuit’, waarlangs de klanten de Drievriendenhof zouden binnen stromen.

De goedkope schoenenwinkel is een tijdelijke oplossing. Maar op de duur komt het allemaal goed. Denkt de heer Vierkant.

De gemeente Dordrecht maakt zich wel zorgen maar stelt zich afwachtend op. Men is doende een vereniging van Vastgoedbezitters op te richten, die als gesprekspartner kan optreden om het binnenstadswinkelgebied te redden (bijvoorbeeld door meer zakelijke dienstverlening toe te staan).

DrievriendenSOF

Sales continue inside, meldt een biljet aan de ingang van de Drievriendenhof.

En inderdaad de hele Drievriendenhof blijkt in de uitverkoop. De kop van de Teevorm, waar Mexx en Brandstore zaten is een somber gat aan het eind. Broodjescounter Délifrance ligt er als laatste overlevende van een schipbreuk verlaten bij. Een goedkope SCHOENEN VOOR WEINIG vult nu de vele vierkante meters die het vertrekkende modehuis Forecast achterliet. Schoenwinkel Footsie is bankroet, evenals Villa Hap (kinderkleding).

Bij Björn Borg een plakkaat: OPHEFFINGSUITVERKOOP tot 70%. Bij SPS hetzelfde bord: 27 augustus de laatste dag. De reden van deze leegstand is uiterst simpel: te weinig omzet voor de te hoge huur. Het personeel mag dat niet hardop zeggen, maar de drastisch teruglopende bezoekersaantallen (met 30% tussen 2007 en 2010) spreken luid en duidelijk.

Vijf jaar geleden moest zo nodig een nieuw concept ingevoerd worden. Goedlopende winkels als juwelier de Meij moesten tegen hun wil verkassen. Met Délifrance werd een rechtszaak uitgevochten. Het idee was dat alleen hoogwaardige kledingwinkels (met daaromheen wat accessoires) een sterke magneet zouden vormen voor het Dordtse publiek. Het was van het begin af aan duidelijk dat dit moest mislukken omdat Dordrecht qua koopkracht onder het gemiddelde scoort.

Eerlijkheidshalve moet gezegd worden dat het in de beginjaren van deze eeuw ook niet zo goed ging met dit winkelcentrum. De facelift die het in 2006 onderging kon niet wegnemen dat van het begin af aan er een fout zat in de ligging. Je moet teruggaan naar het rampzalige saneringsplan, dat een kaalslag voor dit hele gebied betekende, en de vierpolen filosofie van Wethouder Piet Janse, die ten grondslag ligt aan de bouw van dit project. In 1985 gaf de Dordtse Commissie Kunst en Architectuur vijf bekende Nederlandse architectenbureaus (Benthem Crouwel, OMA, Pi de Bruyn, Frits van Dongen en Theo Bosch) opdracht een ontwerp te maken als ‘stedebouwkundige en architectonische verkenning naar de bebouwingsmogelijkheden van de Drievriendenhof’. Daarin zouden winkels, een ‘vestzaktheater’, twee bioscoopzalen, een café-restaurant en een galerie ondergebracht kunnen worden. Benthem en Crouwel maakte een prachtig ontwerp dat zich niet aan de gestelde grenzen hield omdat het idee de hof een onderdeel van een winkelroute te maken niet deugde. Het winkelend publiek zal zich er niet naar toe laten lokken was hun voorspelling. Het bureau weigerde een verdere opdracht omdat de gemeente hun uitgangspunt niet overnam. Ook het ontwerp van Theo Bosch (die de Boogjes had ontworpen) werd niet uitgevoerd. De projectontwikkelaar zag het niet zitten en gaf de opdracht aan K. Rijnboutt. Rudger Smook zegt hierover in het standaardwerk over de geschiedenis van Dordrecht (Uitgeverij Verloren 2000 dl 3 pag. 409): ‘Met dit plan werden de uitersten verkend van wat een historische binnenstad kan verdragen. Omdat het plan structureel slecht in de binnenstad en in het winkelpatroon van het centrumgebied past is het nooit een succes geworden’.

Het is dus de vraag of het ooit een succes kan worden. Een drastische verlaging van de huurprijzen lijkt minimaal nodig. De eigenaar Syntrus Achmea Vastgoed B.V. heeft het winkelcentrum in beheer gegeven bij SCM Shopping Center Management (dat ook winkels op het Statenplein en Bieshof in Stadspolders onder zijn beheer heeft). De gemeente Dordrecht bemoeit zich niet met de huurprijzen zegt woordvoerder Mark Benjamin. Vanuit de economische afdeling is wel overleg met SCM omdat de gemeente het belang van een levendige en economisch vatbare binnenstad hoog in het vaandel heeft. Wat in het overleg besproken is blijft geheim. Achmea heeft plannen voorgelegd waar de gemeente wel positief tegenover staat. Ir. Niels de Bis die bij SCM de Drievriendenhof in zijn portefeuille heeft mag telefonisch geen statement afgeven. De eigenaar Syntrus Achmea wil dat niet. De heer Vierkant van Syntrus Achmea doet zijn naam eer aan en geeft geen informatie over de huurprijzen noch over de toekomstplannen. Hij doet geen mededeling of Dixons en Kruidvat in aanmerking komen, noch met welke mogelijke gegadigden gesprekken worden gevoerd.

Volgens hem valt het allemaal wel mee met teruglopende bezoekerstallen (dat is een landelijke trend) en is er alleen sprake van enige tegenslag door toevallige incidenten met faillissementen van landelijke ketens. Of de formule van hoogwaardige kledingwinkels wordt herzien? “Wij bekijken alle mogelijkheden”. Hij erkent dat er een probleem is met de aanloopstraten, maar de ontwikkeling van het Achterom, waardoor het winkelgebeuren verder uit het centrum trekt, juicht hij toe. Want hij gelooft nog in ‘het circuit’, waarlangs de klanten de Drievriendenhof zouden binnen stromen.

De goedkope schoenenwinkel is een tijdelijke oplossing. Maar op de duur komt het allemaal goed. Denkt de heer Vierkant.

De gemeente Dordrecht maakt zich wel zorgen maar stelt zich afwachtend op. Men is doende een vereniging van Vastgoedbezitters op te richten, die als gesprekspartner kan optreden om het binnenstadswinkelgebied te redden (bijvoorbeeld door meer zakelijke dienstverlening toe te staan).

30

aug

by ton